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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
Dec 8, 2013 8:00pm EST
is that doha and qatar through a number of careful and calculated foreign-policy mechanisms and through this careful use of the foreign policy toolbox, several tools in the toolbox has been able to create conditions whereby they can pursue their interests. and what are some of those tools >> first and foremost, foreign-policy it might be best as hedging and this comes from gambling and it's a term that comes from gambling whereby you place one major bad, let's say you bet on the united states to guarantee your security. and you place a number of smaller bets as well unless they you may then for traumatize with come ons or iran or other individuals they may not necessarily see eye to eye. and what they have been able to do through their carefully calculated policy regimen is to position itself as an important conduit between various actors that otherwise do not speak to one another. so for example, a couple of months ago, qatar was extremely successful, although aborted in many ways, successful and position of itself and that was really an interesting development. and qatar has been able
FOX News
Dec 5, 2013 10:00am PST
the president's approval ratings are taking a hit on a whole host of issues. foreign policy; proval 38 percent. and immigration one of his other signature pieces and issues 35 percent approval. and federal budget that is carl cameron 32. and economy 38. and these are approval ratings. what is going on here? >> not surprising to be honest with you. once a president gets in the soup, all of the numbers have a way of coming down. combine that with the fact that people are not sure about the iran agreement and everything else, it is not a pretty picture. something happen today that may change the trajectory. >> which is what? >> i was those -- teasing you. >> the third quarter growth up to it 3.6 percent. i don't know if that were to hold but if it holds another quarter that could turn the president's fortunes around. >> that is one. michelle what about this? >> this is the first time since 1974 that majority of americans see this country as not powerful, as powerful as a decade ago. they are less respected and think that their country is not important on the global stage and the reason why is the
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
hill a board member at transafrica the oldest foreign policy organization in the united states. transafrica was at the heart of the anti-apartheid fight in the 1980's and she traveled with nelson mandel la o mandela on hp to the united states. thank verthank you very much fog us. >> urchyou are both uniquely positioned to talk about nelson mandela. what was your reaction to the news that nelson mandela passed. >> we all expected that he would pass in the immediate future but we are deeply saddened by the loss of one of the world's great greatest leaders and statesmen. all of us mourn with the south africans on this sad and tragic day. >> silvia your reaction. >> very much the same. dying is a part of life. but with such a spirit that had really taken such a role of seeking justice. it almost seemed like an era i knew in my heart of hearts that phase of struggle. >> let us keep our love together so that we form a solid form against racism. we are sure that that day comes now. while our common actions let them show that justice tr triums without delay. when that has come to pass,
Dec 6, 2013 5:00am EST
and economic assistance. other tools of former -- foreign policy. the state department budget is puny in comparison to the defense budget. you get an awful lot of benefit from some of those investments that the state department, in terms of assistance, economic assistance and it is that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in getting bipartisan support. moree senate, we have bipartisan support for that. lindsey graham, john mccain, they have been big supporters of a robust state department budget. house, some of our colleagues on the republican -- broadlyially defined as the tea party folks, it has been difficult trying to convince them of the important national security arguments in favor of that form of assistance. this is a constant back-and- forth. if you look at the house republican budget over the ten- year period, it would cut the category of the budget for those kind of state department operations. we going to have to work together to try and prevent it. if you want to do the kinds of things that mike rogers wants to do and i agree with most
Dec 6, 2013 12:00pm EST
have tried to be supportive. there have been various foreign- policy initiatives that i have not attacked him and try to be supportive of him on. on the drug issues, it has taken him a while, but he is now doing something about some of the minimums.bill in -- on infrastructure, there is a way that infrastructure only for the trip across america, we could have more infrastructure money is all the money earned overseas by american corporations, nearly $2 trillion from it could be brought home. andit at five % -- at 5%, probably hundreds of billions of dollars in money comes home, but justin tax revenue, at 5%, you would doubled the money we have available for infrastructure and if we could just tax it at 5%. win-win solution. we lowered the tax rate. we get more revenue and we build some roads. and i talked to the president about that, and the president cbo score is a loss of revenue because it is not coming in at 35%. 0% is coming home. we have to overcome the cbo score on this. i said, that's vote to overturn -- let's vote to overturn all the other roles, let's vote to overtu
FOX News
Dec 3, 2013 12:00pm PST
in foreign policy. we don't get to choose our partners and we end up having to do business with lots of odeus regimes we may not like because they have things that we need. and so that involves tradeoffs between -- and those tradeoffs involve clashes between our interests, what we need, what we need to keep the world safe, and our values, things like human rights, democracy, caring about corruption, et cetera. and those tradeoffs are hard to make. sometimes we have to choose one rather than the other. >> specifically on afghanistan, it looks like what we're paying for is control and some influence in a part of the world where we need more of it. $13 billion a year is a lot of coin. >> it ills but this is -- part of the story with afghanistan, you break it, you own it. we invaded and tried too build up. we're spending a lot of money now trying to build up an afghan was so when we leave we don't there before we came in. and so it opportunity become a base for al qaeda or other international terrorist. >> i know that's what we're trying to do. whether we are we're gifting there is another matter
Dec 8, 2013 10:30am EST
of the agenda at their own national security foreign policy interest. if this is good for russia, they will be at the table. that is a double edged sword. it can be a great way to solve some problems across the middle east, but we need to be extremely cautious of setting the table but so any agreement or arrangement with the russians also protects u.s., our allies interests in the region as well. the assad -- if you look at the tenets of the chemical agreement, great we got some chemical weapons off, but the russians cleaned up on us on exactly what they got in that particular field. and because of that we alienated our allies in the region. that is an important component. i am for getting that deal, but we are paying a price for that deal, but not only including the allies in negotiating that deal. >> let's consider this conversation on syria. we you were a sponsor in the summer of the free syria act, a bill to provide arms and support to the syrian rebels. when we interviewed the representative, he said he was pleased to have your co- sponsorship of the bill, a bipartisan effor
Dec 3, 2013 3:00pm PST
't think it was well conceptualized and i don't think it has furthered chinese foreign policy or national security. >> woodruff: so what you have seen happen, campbell, is u.s. japan, south korea, continues military fights over that airspace, that airspace, was this -- what are the chance this is becomes a diplomatic standoff and escalates from that to a military standoff involving any of those players? >> what has gone on between japan and china has now gone on for over a year and this is like a case of the mumps, you know, it comes and goes. these territorial issues are nothing new in asia, but this particular cycle has been longer and more intense. i think the most likely thing is not a diplomatic crisis which then turns into a military crisis, but a lone actor, a guy on a fishing boat or a plane captain that basically exceeds what, you know, hopefully are occurrence rules of engagements and there is a collision or a crash or a local crisis which then has an intense short duration but in that particular area which will really cause a crisis in relations between china and japan. >> wood
Dec 2, 2013 10:00am EST
to our foreign policy series discussion on the recently signed interim agreement between iran and the p5 plus germany and geneva. we have gathered a distinguished panel of experts who will walk us through what just happened and what may lie ahead. headlines during the last 48 hours have run the entire spectrum from victory for iran obamastoric mistake to achieves historic measure. most comments have followed what has become a redeemable republican/democrat divide, but recent polls indicate that nearly 2/3 of all americans support an agreement with iran at would lift sanctions for iran in return for tehran restricting its nuclear program. what is undeniable is that there are many layers to this cake, and we look forward to hearing from our panelists as they discuss whether the agreement brings new hope for nuclear negotiations with iran or further disappointment. our panelists are no strangers to the world affairs council audiences. we welcome back all three. ambassador john bloomberg is professor at the united -- professor of international affairs at the united states naval academy -- am
Dec 6, 2013 2:00pm EST
necessary for our folks. >> did you have a question? >> thank you. i am a fellow at the foreign policy institute here at sais. you mentioned one common interest the united states has with russia and syria is to prevent syria from becoming a base of operations for al qaeda. once we start changing the border regime in that part of the world, we are in for changes that will have many repercussions. my question is as follows -- do you foresee in the medium-term, scenario where we see assad staying in power as being instrumental in that we share with the russians. > i think the american position, which i support, has been that you had, in syria, at he beginning of the arab spring, a movement that represented the aspirations of the majority of the syrian people across the secretary and lines for more openness and hange. the assad regime is a brutal regime that suppresses the rights of the people. e need to change the regime in syria. the challenge has been -- from our perspective we think be syrian the people deserve a government, one that represents their aspirations. we need to make sure t
Dec 5, 2013 8:00pm EST
important tools of foreign-policy which as secretary gates and other secretaries of defense have made clear, the state department budget is unique in comparison with the defense budget but again an awful lot of benefit from some of those state department both in terms of assistance, economic assistance and other forms of assistance and it's that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in getting bipartisan support. although i would say in the senate we have more, much more bipartisan support so for example senator lindsey graham and senator john mccain have been very big supporters of a robust state department budget as well. but in the house certainly some of our colleagues on the public inside a specially broadly defined as the tea party folks, i mean they have got, it's been really difficult trying to convince them of the important national security arguments in favor of that assistance. but again this is a constant back-and-forth and if you look at the house republican budget over the ten-year period it dramatically dramatically, it would dramatically cut
Dec 4, 2013 3:00am EST
's much of a description of his foreign policy. but congress has lots of power if he chooses to use. the power of the purse is an enormous power, and i think if i were you, i would find ways to influence policy using the congress' powers, which were not doing. for example, we are hearing complaints about the president's actions do not enforce deportation against a certain classes of immigrants. you know, instead of complaining about that, this committee could hold a markup and report of a comprehensive immigration reform bill, send it to the for -- >> mr. lazarus, you are -- not you but the question is too inept minutes over. so you can do this by giving us advice of what our legislative agenda should lock like an answer the question, i would be grateful to you. >> that is an answer. i think on this has a lot of power and it should use it. >> and i assume that the failure to exercise is also an exercise of power. the failure to act. mr. cannon, would you like to briefly -- >> maybe mr. lazarus knows better than i do how many bombs the president has dropped before that becomes more.
Dec 4, 2013 10:00am EST
the significant nature of the shift in american foreign policy that we are seeing laid out before us . i would be honored to recognize my colleague and friend, the gentleman from california, mr. sherman. mr. sherman: i thank the gentleman for yielding. the political pund its are focused on -- pund its, are focused on was this a good deal or a bad deal. we aren't here to give a grade to the administration. we are here in congress to decide what legislation should be passed. congress is a policy-making body, although so often those in the administration think that we are, at most, advisers or critics. but let's take a look at this deal and we'll see that what we get out of it is at least overstated by its proponents. because we are told that this halts their enrichment of uranium. it is true that it limits their 20% uranium. and iran will not be making progress during the six-month period of this deal toward its first bomb. but they will be making very substantial progress toward their eighth, ninth and tenth bomb and iran is not a nuclear power until they have some to hide, one to two to test.
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)